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ALAIN DANIÉLOU

Alain Daniélou (France, 1907-Switzerland 1994), departed for the East in his youth with the Swiss photographer Raymond Burnier, and settled in India, initially with Rabindranath Tagore, who appointed him director of his school of music at Shantiniketan. Later, Alain Daniélou retired to Banaras, living in a mansion on the banks of the Ganges (Rewa Kothi). In Banaras, he discovered the traditional culture of India, into which he was gradually initiated. He was to stay there for fifteen years. He studied classical Indian music and learned to play the vina. He also studied Hindi, Sanskrit and philosophy. In 1949, he was appointed professor at the Banaras Hindu University and director of the College of Indian Music. In 1954, he left Banaras to take up the post of director of the Adyar Library of Sanskrit manuscripts and editions in Madras.
He later returned to Europe and, in 1963, with the help of the Ford Foundation, created the International Institute for Comparative Music Studies, in Berlin and Venice. By organising concerts for the great musicians of Asia and by publishing record collections of traditional music, under the aegis of Unesco, he played a major part in the West's rediscovery of Asian art music.
The long list of his publications include Hindu Polytheism /The Myths and Gods of India; Virtue, Success, Pleasure and Liberation, The Four Aims of Life; The Ragas of Northern Indian Music; Music and the Power of Sound; The Tradition of Shiva and Dionysus; etc. He also has published several translations, such as: Manimekhalai, The Dancer with the Magic Bowl, and his complete translation of the Kama Sutra. His memoirs are called The Way to the Labyrinth: Memoirs from East and West.
Alain Daniélou (France, 1907-Switzerland 1994), departed for the East in his youth with the Swiss photographer Raymond Burnier, and settled in India, initially with Rabindranath Tagore, who appointed him director of his school of music at Shantiniketan. Later, Alain Daniélou retired to Banaras, living in a mansion on the banks of the Ganges (Rewa Kothi). In Banaras, he discovered the traditional culture of India, into which he was gradually initiated. He was to stay there for fifteen years. He studied classical Indian music and learned to play the vina. He also studied Hindi, Sanskrit and philosophy. In 1949, he was appointed professor at the Banaras Hindu University and director of the College of Indian Music. In 1954, he left Banaras to take up the post of director of the Adyar Library of Sanskrit manuscripts and editions in Madras.
He later returned to Europe and, in 1963, with the help of the Ford Foundation, created the International Institute for Comparative Music Studies, in Berlin and Venice. By organising concerts for the great musicians of Asia and by publishing record collections of traditional music, under the aegis of Unesco, he played a major part in the West's rediscovery of Asian art music.
The long list of his publications include Hindu Polytheism /The Myths and Gods of India; Virtue, Success, Pleasure and Liberation, The Four Aims of Life; The Ragas of Northern Indian Music; Music and the Power of Sound; The Tradition of Shiva and Dionysus; etc. He also has published several translations, such as: Manimekhalai, The Dancer with the Magic Bowl, and his complete translation of the Kama Sutra. His memoirs are called The Way to the Labyrinth: Memoirs from East and West.